Dishonesty Can Actually Damage Your Ability to Read People

statue of Venus wearing a blindfold
Image by Pixabay / CC BY

It’s well known that dishonesty can be damaging to interpersonal relationships. When we find out someone has lied to us, it can be very difficult to trust them again.

But how about the other side of things? When someone has lied to us, even if no one discovers that they have lied, does the act carry consequences for them as well?  » Read more

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Polyamory and Reformed Cheaters: Fessing Up is Hard to Do

a photo of a person in a white shirt viewed from the back, they are sitting in a field of grass, text over picture reads "the first boy I ever loved was my best friend and I'm afraid that's what pushed him away"
Image by whatmegsaid / CC BY

Polyamory is Harder for Reformed Cheaters

“Polyamory? That’s something that’s for reformed cheaters, right?”

And I want to say no when people say that, but it’s a great deal more complicated than that.

While there are plenty of people who become polyamorous without ever being physically unfaithful as monogamous people, there are others who did.  » Read more

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Consensus as Illusory Evidence

Lately, I’ve been rolling around the concepts of dishonesty vs.  an incomplete (or even merely representational) model – or similarly, inaccuracy as distinguished from explicit deception.

These are the stones that my brain tumbles in a constant attempt to smooth them.

I addressed this earlier within the framework of the popular logical problem in my essay,  » Read more

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Pinocchio

A riddle:

You come to a fork in the road. One way leads to safety, and the other way to death. One liar and one truth-teller are there (you can’t tell them apart) and you only have time to ask one question. What will you ask and which road will you take?

Answer: “Which road would the other person take?”  » Read more

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