“Of Course, Most People Feel Like I Do” — False Consensus Bias & You

person with head in their hands. Over their normal face is a pasted-on cartoon angry face
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Not everyone thinks the way you think, knows the things you know, believes the things you believe, nor acts the way you would act.

Remember this and you will go a long way in getting along with people.

-Arthur Forman

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False consensus bias is a cognitive bias that causes people to see our own behavior and opinions as more common than it actually is.  » Read more

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I’ve Had My Own Advice Used Against Me… and That’s a Good Thing

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“Are you sure about that?” my partner says. “Because I think you’re biased here.”

“Well,” I say in response, my voice dripping with equal parts defensiveness and smugness, “I may be biased. But that doesn’t mean I’m wrong.”

“You know,” my partner says, “that reminds me of something a relationship writer once wrote.”  » Read more

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You’re Likely to Weight Your Introduction to Something Far More Than You Should

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Image by Keith Hall / CC BY

It can be kind of annoying sometimes, and humbling, but the truth is that the human brain is calibrated for speed, not accuracy.

It makes sense when you think of it from an evolutionary perspective. Snap decisions are crucial in survival settings. If you’re being chased by a predator, it’s more important that you react quickly.  » Read more

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The IKEA Effect: We Love Things More That We Personally Built

the outside of an IKEA store viewed from the parking lot. A parking lot marker reading "A" can also be seen in the shot.
Image by Sam Greenhalgh / CC BY

By now, practically everyone has heard of IKEA, thanks to their increasingly expanding set of stores as well as Jonathan Coulton’s excellent tribute song to them. (“Billy the bookcase says hello” by the way.) And anyone who has any firsthand experience with IKEA knows that while they offer timeless modernist style at scandalous prices, it also comes with a time commitment.  » Read more

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Why It Can Be Difficult to Trust People, Even When They Believe What They Say

The worth "truth" with a magnifying glass placed over the U in the word, showing that if you look closer, there are many "lies" underneath
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The more you know about bias and how deeply it’s entrenched in our brains, the more it becomes truly difficult to trust other people. How they will treat us. If what they say to us is true…

Unfortunately, we’re all capable of saying untrue things, regardless of any moral commitment to truthfulness. Contrary to what a lot of people think,  » Read more

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When “Problematic” Becomes Problematic: Identity Assumptions, Dissonance, and Confessions

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Today’s piece is a guest blog post from Fluffy, an academic in-training, who is studying organizational behavior in hopes of making the world a better place.

Fluffy is a frequent contributor to Poly Land. Their regular blog is Eclectic Discourse (where pith goes to die; in-depth looks at awkward topics).

Here’s what they wrote for us today:

Finding Something Problematic Tells Me More About You

As someone who does the delicate dance between the worlds of social justice and diversity and inclusion,  » Read more

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It’s Humbling to Realize We Do Not See Things As They Really Are, But We Don’t

a fuzzy light shining behind a curtain that's been pulled back
Image by Tiffa Day / CC BY

“The brain is designed with blind spots, optical and psychological, and one of its cleverest tricks is to confer on us the comforting illusion that we, personally, do not have any…’naive realism’ [is] the inescapable conviction that we perceive objects and events clearly, ‘as they really are. ‘ We assume that other reasonable people see things the same way we do.  » Read more

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