Dogmatic People Are Less Likely to Seek Out New Info When Things Are Unclear

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dogmatism (noun) – the tendency to lay down principles are incontrovertibly true, without consideration of evidence or the opinions of others

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I know some very strong-willed people that I adore. Folks that others might call stubborn because they perceive them to not back down easily when in conflict with someone else.  » Read more

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What Is the Personal Fable & How Can It Inform Your Risk-Taking Decision-Making?

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In yesterday’s edition of Psyched for the Weekend, I talked about adolescent disembedding, a normal developmental stage in which teenagers create emotional distance and rebel against rules in order to establish and understand their own identity.

Today I wanted to tackle another hallmark of adolescence: The personal fable.  » Read more

What Is the Personal Fable?

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What Adolescent Disembedding Is & Why It’s So Often Confused with Family Estrangement

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It’s broadly known that teenagers become rebellious. Even the sweetest children often have a phase in adolescence where they test the limits set upon them. And many kids at this point will also arbitrarily and suddenly decide at this point as well that even parents they were formerly close to are now tragically uncool.

It’s so common a phenomenon that it’s a trope.  » Read more

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Not Getting Enough Sleep Makes It More Difficult to Unlearn Fear

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Stressful jobs can lead to you not getting enough sleep. And as it turns out, not getting enough sleep can make it easier for stressful fearful events to take hold of us. Today’s study drills down into this vicious cycle with the help of brain imaging.

Prior to this experiment, one third of the study participants slept normally,  » Read more

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A Mindset Called “Wise Reasoning” Can Lead to More Productive Relationship Conflicts

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I’ve long been an advocate for the importance of being able to take other people’s perspectives — in general but specifically when it comes to close relationships. The worst conflicts I’ve had have been whenever one or both of us became utterly intransigent. Fixed in our views. And wouldn’t entertain that the other person was inhabiting a different position,  » Read more

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“Of Course, Most People Feel Like I Do” — False Consensus Bias & You

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Not everyone thinks the way you think, knows the things you know, believes the things you believe, nor acts the way you would act.

Remember this and you will go a long way in getting along with people.

-Arthur Forman

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False consensus bias is a cognitive bias that causes people to see our own behavior and opinions as more common than it actually is.  » Read more

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“Single” Doesn’t Have to Mean “Lonely” or “Unhappy,” Especially When Your Friends Rock

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Amatonormativity: (noun) the assumption that a central, exclusive, amorous relationship is normal for humans, in that it is a universally shared goal, and that such a relationship is normative, in the sense that it should be aimed at in preference to other relationship types

We’ve talked many times on this site about amatonormativity.  » Read more

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We Like & Get Along Better With People Who Are Similar to Us

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What makes us want to be friends with someone? What makes for a good, satisfying romantic relationship?

Some people would say that opposites attract. But frankly, decades of empirical research point in the other direction: Compatibility is based on having things in common. While there seems to be a role for complementarity —  » Read more

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Being Interrupted at Work Physically Stresses You Out

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Once upon a time, I was the manager of a large training department at a psychological consulting firm. I loved some things about that position but other things… not so much. The thing I liked the least about that job was probably the commute. It was 45 minutes each way in no traffic and good weather but often took me about 2 hours in typical rush hour conditions.  » Read more

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