Could Procrastination Sometimes Be a Form of Masochism?

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Image by Vic / CC BY

It turns out procrastination is not typically a function of laziness, apathy or work ethic as it is often regarded to be. It’s a neurotic self-defense behavior that develops to protect a person’s sense of self-worth.

You see, procrastinators tend to be people who have, for whatever reason, developed to perceive an unusually strong association between their performance and their value as a person.  » Read more

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“I Was Slapped in the Face During Sex Without My Consent. Was I Raped?”

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Image by Pixabay / CC 0

Bit of a personal one, but here goes.

I was in a relationship with a guy who was kinky and poly. I was definitely curious to the kink side of things. I’d also had some abuse in my background. My “friend” and I talked about all of this. I don’t know if me being curious and interested amounts to consent,  » Read more

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Ask Page: Can He Force Me Into Mono/Poly Just Because He’s a Dominant?

it's a toy figure of the Incredible Hulk, a shirtless green body builder type guy in purple shorts
Image by Pixabay / CC BY

Hi Page,

I’m kind of new to this whole thing, being kinky and poly. Been talking to someone, and I have doubts. I would love to know if you could shed some light on them.

Talking to a guy right now, and he says that just because he’s a Dominant that he can go out with other submissives while he doesn’t even let me talk to other people.  » Read more

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3 Differences Between a Dominant & Someone Who Just Uses it as an Excuse to Be Controlling

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Image by Phil Long / CC BY

What is the difference between a dominant and someone who just uses it as an excuse to be controlling?

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1. Consent Is an Important Part of Dominance.

The bottom line is very simple: It boils down to consent.

A healthy D/s relationship happens between two people who are willing participants.  » Read more

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